A radical choice for equality in Tunisia

Category: News
Tunisia, the North African nation that ignited the 2011 Arab Spring, keeps sparking new lessons for Arab and Muslim countries in the basics of democracy. Last Sunday’s election of a new president was no exception. The surprise victor, law professor Kais Saied, won in large part because

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New poverty busters get their due

Category: News
Global poverty has been cut by more than half in the past couple of decades and one reason may be a new type of poverty-buster. A new branch of economics has radically changed views about poor people and what they are capable of. On Monday, three leaders in the field were honored with the 2019

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Sea levels are rising, so why is coastal construction?

Category: News
Bill Cobau, a retired college professor, has spent 30 years watching the tides rise higher and higher in Charleston, South Carolina. One flood last year ruined his floor. Yet coastal development, not retreat from rising sea levels, is still ascendant here and in other communities along

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What Turkey wants after U.S. leaves Syrian border

Category: News
Ankara, Turkey Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has long threatened to send troops into northeastern Syria to clear the border region of Syrian Kurdish fighters whom Turkey considers a serious security threat. A Turkish invasion looked more likely after President Donald Trump’s

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Dictator: deposed. Democracy: check. But what about jobs?

Category: News
Farmer Mohammed Jamee hoped Tunisia’s revolution in 2010 would open up opportunities for his five children. Instead, times only got tougher. In late 2012, he moved to Tunis to find work, part of a growing urban migration from the struggling outer provinces. Today he earns $8 a day as a laborer

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Last of the enforcers? How hockey skated away from fights.

Category: News
From the cult classic “Slapshot” to the old Blackhawks arena, fighting is sewn into the fabric of hockey. It remains the only major professional sport where coming to blows doesn’t bring an automatic ejection. Crowds inevitably still give a Roman Colosseum roar of approval. But in the new NHL

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Rewriting the historical epic: African women writers go big

Category: News
Ayesha Harruna Attah, a Ghanaian writer, uses her fiction to discuss the complicated role that Africans played in the transatlantic slave trade. “The Hundred Wells of Salaga” centers on the lives of two women – one princess, one slave – whose lives tangle against the backdrop of a struggle for

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